Christian Anarchism (updated 7-25-12)

A couple of times now I’ve been party to conversations in which “Christian anarchism” comes into play (most recent). Each time, someone has reacted by saying that anarchy is chaos and is therefore against all that is good and godly. Regardless of whether someone looks on Christian anarchism with favor or disfavor, one should at least understand the philosophy and practice before deciding. I hope these resources will help in this regard.

Anarchism definition: “Anarchism is generally defined as the political philosophy which holds the state to be undesirable, unnecessary, and harmful, or alternatively as opposing authority and hierarchical organization in the conduct of human relations. Proponents of anarchism, known as ‘anarchists’, advocate stateless societies based on non-hierarchical voluntary associations” (Wikipedia).

Christian anarchism definition: “[T]he belief that there is only one source of authority to which Christians are ultimately answerable, the authority of God as embodied in the teachings of Jesus. More than any other Bible source the Sermon on the Mount, and Jesus’ call to not resist evil but turn the other cheek, are used as the basis for Christian anarchism” (Wikipedia).

Two articles:

Two websites:

Three books:

A Primer on Christian Anarchism (Van Steenwyk, Jesus Radicals, 2012)

>Economic Justice

A classmate presented on 3 approaches to economic justice today: Christian Anarchy, Christian Marxism and Liberation Theology.

In preparation, we were to read from Marx and the Bible by Christian Marxist writer José Porfirio Miranda. The explanation of “cultus” or “cult” on this Wikipedia page is helpful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultus.

To get a sense of Christian Anarchy, we were to browse www.jesusradicals.com and watch this short video on Participatory Economics: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ar6QN7jcNM.

For more on land tax, we were directed to Chapter 9 of From wasteland to Promised Land: liberation theology for a post-Marxist world (Robert V. Andelson & James M. Dawsey) as a description of how Christian values mesh with the Land Value Tax. Two links for a general/secular overview were shared: