Selma and Cesar Chavez

Tonight we watch the film Cesar Chavez, and it reminded me of Selma, which we watched shortly before listening to Senator John Lewis speak. (As an aside, almost a decade ago we attended an event where Dolores Huerta spoke, so it was interesting to see how she was played in the film by Rosario Dawson.) Both movies look at social movements, exploring the leaders, tactics, economics, politics and spirituality of social change.

An important theme in my mind is unity in diversity, the bringing together of different people groups. In Selma, it was white and black, to oversimplify. In Cesar Chavez it was Hispanic and Filipino, later American and European. And others like the various unions and even consumers and workers. Connections and coalitions are vital for positive change.

I saw this embodied in a small, local way recently. We attended a march hosted by two student groups at a local university–the Black student union and the Muslim student union. We walked and chanted, “Black lives matter. All lives matter.” It was a limited event in both time and scale–we marched, some gave impromptu speeches, we marched some more, some shared ideas for how to work for change, and then we dispersed–but I appreciated these different student groups were working together.

Here are trailers for both films:

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Environmental Article Round-up

I haven’t posted ecological links in a long time, so my list has grown unruly. Here are some random bits and pieces for contemplation:

Environmental videos at See, Hear, SpeakLINK

A Food Experiment

Some friends of mine are doing a 7-month experiment–Getting By With Less. Each month they are focusing on a different area of life to simplify, based on Jen Hatmaker’s book, 7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess. August was media; September will be food.

One person–my wife–will be experimenting with the food that her students had available before joining her classroom. She chose four of the countries of origin, and is only going to eat what is readily available to economically challenged people in those countries (in every country, some people dine while others barely make it). Here is her chart for the month:

food chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart based on info gathered at COTS Fasts and Feasts.

Additional Benefits of Eating Organic

In 2006 I wrote a brief essay for my mother-in-law outlining why I believed organic food and clothing (cotton & hemp) were important. While I still view that essay as valid, it is now dated. There is much more detailed information available now than what I could find on the Internet then. I probably should update that description, but for now I’ll share here two more sets of reasons why organic is important–bees and personal health.

Bee Health

Bee Colony Collapse Disorder is a complicated issue. It appears that a cocktail of pesticides and fungicides makes bees susceptible to a parasite. Learn more here:

Personal Health

In addition to the health benefits of eating organic food noted in my 2006 essay, the following recent stories add more details:

Preserve your health and the bees, eat (and wear) organic!

Friday Web Round-up

MISC PEACE, JUSTICE & HUMAN RIGHTS

ENVIRONMENT

FOOD & FARMING

SEX & GENDER

RACE

MEDIA

TRAFFICKING

News Round-up

Religion

Education

Politics

Environment

Food

War +Violence + Peace

Business  Ethics

World

SEE ALSO:

Articles of Note (Updated)

I couldn’t sleep, so I got up and did some online reading. Here is a sampling:

Recommended Reading (and viewing)

Here is your reading assignment for today:

Environment & Health:

Society & Culture & Life & Activism & Stuff:

Off-center Religion and Politics and Government:

Coffee:

Prana’s Wisdom:

Economics:

Selected Canadian Views on US Politics and Economy:

Against Democrats:

Against Republicans:

What’s an Independent to Do?

Random bits for the unemployed:

BONUS 1: Three Classic Articles on Christian Social Ethics

BONUS 2: I AM

On Health and Healing

The story of Bhava Ram learning to get up and find new life is inspiring to me. It reminds me of these three documentaries:

CRAZY, SEXY CANCER (2007)

MAY I BE FRANK (2010)

FAT, SICK & NEARLY DEAD (2011)

Watch this third one for free on Hulu.

Dirt!

Last night I watched Dirt!, a documentary that considers many perspectives on the uses for and value of dirt. Some parts felt far-fetched (e.g., I’m sure some other planets have dirt; we’ve analyzed so few to know), but most parts were thought-provoking. Even some sections that seemed pointless (paving dirt on the Indian floor every day) actually speak to ways of life that I believe will outlast modern industrial farming and all that goes with it.

You can watch it on Hulu for free or stream it “instantly” on Netflix.

Some of the topics in the film reminded me of three articles I’ve read recently: