|Podcast Episodes on Race, Bigotry, and a Bit of Politics (Updated)

I often listen to podcasts while walking to and from work. In the past few weeks, a number of episodes have dealt with racial issues and bigotry in one way or another. Here are five (listed in the order I heard them, I think):

1. The RobCast (Rob Bell) — The Priesthood of Alexander Shaia (Ep 137). “No hate.” Thanks for sharing this with me Andrew.

2. The Ingredients Podcast (Michael Nixon) — Andrew Gerard (Ep 004). The former US president, the current president, and what it might mean.

3. The Ingredients Podcast (Michael Nixon) — Garrison Hayes, Pt 1 (Ep 008). Racial reflections on Andrews University. Part 2 is also now posted, but I haven’t listened to it yet. [More: Spectrum articleIt Is Time AU Video, & AU Response. I don’t have a link to the original sermon by Dr. Kowlessar; the one listed in the Spectrum article is no longer working.]

4. Chasing Justice (The Justice Conference) — Cornel West (Ep 9). “Justice is what love looks like in public.” Too bad it’s hard to link to specific episodes.

5. Voices of Social Justice (Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights; University of Georgia) — Reverend Attorney Francys Johnson  (Ep 1027). Johnson “gives an impassioned keynote address at Athens 1st Social Justice Symposium.”

Okay, one more that kind of somewhat a little relates at some some level — The Dirtbag Diaries: 2017 The Year of Big Ideas.

6. Update: Chasing Justice (The Justice Conference) — Shane Claiborne (Ep 14). Against the death penalty.

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Systemic Racism for Dummies

Visual posted a short video on system racism. You can view it on Facebook here, where you’ll also have access to an extensive list of additional resources. I’ve also embedded the video below:

McKinney, TX, Pool Party + More on Race

Pool Party Incident

Additional Articles Addressing Racial Issues in America

On the Murder of Nine African-American Christians in Charleston, SC [UPDATED]

These articles offer commentary that I either appreciate or will soon read. 🙂 I’m thankful for the articles people share with me, but I’m having a hard time keeping up. I’ll keep track of my list here, updating as I learn more. Listed in reverse chronological order:

Somewhat related:

About Rachel Dolezal and Identity and Integrity [UPDATED]

When the story of Rachel Dolezal’s secret identity broke, I had no idea how to think through it. Naturally, I turned to “hashtag research” to see what others were saying. Here are some of the posts that stood out to me. Below are articles that I found or that were shared with me later.

The ‪#‎AskRachel‬ meme showed me how little I know, so I appreciated this – https://instagram.com/p/33qKIVTN7q/.

This showed up along the way – https://instagram.com/p/3322FBuaI5/ – reminding me that I had just been learning about the TX incident when the identity story went live. Too many stories too fast. I can’t learn from one before the next one hits.

Deeper Analysis:

Race, Crime, Perception and Consequences in America

Recently, I highlighted a book by Michelle Alexander that looks at race and incarceration in the United States. I also included a link to the following speech that she gave in Chicago in 2013.

AJ+ offers a shorter, less-detailed summary of this reality:

Continuing with this theme, Marquaysa Battle has posted 12 Heartbreaking Facts About The School To Prison Pipeline That Every Person Should Know,” a compilation of stats and graphics that you may have seen floating independently on social media. Taken together, it adds breadth to the arguments Michelle Alexander advances. For instance, it adds foster care statistics to the conversation. Naturally, correlation and causation continue to be issues to think through when digesting statistics.

Two articles in the Baltimore Sun represent the priorities of incarceration and education. Arguments are not lacking for either side, but in the end, the decisions reflect society’s priorities.

This week we witnessed another case study in law enforcement and race; however, this time it was from the other side–police action to stop a fight between biker gangs in Texas. This situation is not entirely identical to the situations in Ferguson or Baltimore (or…), so we have to be careful about drawing conclusions. Regardless, these two articles make some meaningful observations about law enforcement’s approach in Texas:

Differences in perceptions of black and white individuals are also explored in the following scenarios:

ABC 20 20 What Would You Do Racism In America, Part 1 HQ (YouTube, Uploaded 2009)

ABC 20 20 What Would You Do Racism In America, Part 2 HQ (YouTube, Uploaded 2009)

Black Man Vs. White Man Carrying AR-15 Legally (YouTube, Uploaded May 2015)

Deleted material from AR-15 stop above (YouTube, Uploaded March 2013)

Taking this conversation in a different direction, The Real News posted a conversation between Cornel West, Eddie Conway, and Rev. Sekou on building a mass movement for racial justice (link).

Two additional articles on race in America:

Finally, I’m not sure how to overcome the psychology of the human brain described in this article — The Most Depressing Discovery About the Brain, Ever (Kaplan, AlterNet, 16 Sept 2013). It seems like we learn from experience more than from statistics, but how do we enable one group to experience the reality of another group so that learning can take place? In an era of self-segregation, how do people of good will overcome racism? What role can and should faith communities play in working for and demonstrating the beloved community?

It’s easy for my wife and I to march a bit, and we should, but I see that we also need to be about the harder work of building community.

Resources on Racial Justice

I have not read widely on racial topics, I admit up front. At a recent conference on race and justice, I learned about two books that look like important ones to engage.

  1. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (Michelle Alexander). We watched this presentation that she gave in 2013. From a gender perspective, the book looks like it might compliment Disruptive Christian Ethics: When Racism and Women’s Lives Matter (Traci West). I mean, it sounds like Alexander is focusing more on men, and West focuses on women in this book.
  2. The White Racial Frame: Centuries of Racial Framing and Counter-Framing (Joe Feagin).

Here are a few other related links: